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Thursday, 05 June 2008 17:00

California Bill 2825 Amended

On May 29, AB 2825 (Carter) Automotive Repair: Crash Parts. AB 2825 was voted 73-0 Ayes on its third reading in the Assembly. It would require that upon completion of auto body repairs the automotive repair dealer must provide the customer with a written certification that the crash parts identified on the written estimate were installed on the customer's motor vehicle. The bill would also require that invoices for auto body repair work specify if any used, rebuilt, remanufactured, or reconditioned parts are supplied.

The bill is virtually the same as one vetoed by the governor last year: an automotive repair dealer (dealer) must provide written certification that the crash parts identified on the written estimate, prior to the completion of the repairs and on the attached invoices, are the same crash parts installed on the vehicle.

Specifically, this version of the bill :

1) Requires both the invoice and the prior written estimate to disclose whether new, used, rebuilt, reconditioned or remanufactured parts were or are going to be supplied.

2) Requires dealers to provide a notice to a consumer, as specified, that the substitution of parts without prior approval from the customer is unlawful, and the consumer may contact the Bureau of Automotive Repair (BAR) for more information.

3) Requires dealers to provide copies of invoices from the distributor, dealer or manufacturer for all crash parts installed in excess of $50.

4) Requires dealers to provide, as specified, written certification that the crash parts identified on the written estimate, prior to the completion of the repairs and on the attached invoices, are the same crash parts installed on the vehicle.


Background

The AB 2825 Carter bill was voted out of the California Assembly Business and Professions Committee on April 9th with a vote of eight (8) aye votes and (0) no's.  The California Autobody Association is opposed to this bill and testified against it at the hearing.  This bill is virtually the same bill as last year's (AB 1483) that the CAA and its members lobbied the Governor on and he vetoed.  It still requires auto body shops to certify with an additional signature that the crash parts identified on the estimate and the invoice were actually installed on the vehicle.

Testimony in support of the bill came from the Center for Auto Safety (CAS) and from insurance companies.   The CAA and other groups will continue to lobby in opposition of this bill.

The SB 1371 (Correa) bill that is the CAA sponsored bill will require insurers to pay the costs of paint and material charges associated with automobile damage insurance claims. The bill makes it illegal for insurers to cap or limit paint and related material charges.

The other groups that are also supporting SB 1371 are the Collision Repair Association of California (CRA), the Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety, California Motor Car Dealers Association, and the Personal Insurance Federation.

Current amended language on both of these bills can be accessed at www.leginfo.ca.gov.

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