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Friday, 07 December 2018 23:22

Speakers at SCRS’ 'Ideas Collide' Discuss Their Visions for Industry’s Future

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Amir Hever said a security system his company developed to detect vehicle anomalies could be used to spot collision damage quickly. Amir Hever said a security system his company developed to detect vehicle anomalies could be used to spot collision damage quickly.

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An automated system that can detect tiny dents or other vehicle “anomalies” within seconds. Collision parts being ordered within minutes of a crash. A not-for-profit data repository that would ensure shops have long-term access to their job file records.

 

These were among the topics covered in a unique TED Talk-style presentation at “Ideas Collide,” a new session that the Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) hosted during SEMA in Las Vegas in November. SCRS invited 10 speakers to offer ideas or visions related to the future of collision repair in 10 minutes or less.

 

Dan Langford of the Nevada Center for Advanced Mobility, for example, said he envisions that telematics data from a vehicle involved in a crash, combined with OEM data and historical claims data, could enable the needed parts for the repair of that vehicle to arrive at the shop before the car itself does.

 

“I’m willing to bet you can actually start getting a clear idea of estimating the cost of the damage in most crashes [just from the data],” Langford said. “So within an hour or half-hour of an incident happening, you have an understanding of what parts are going to be needed to repair that. It’s not completely crazy to think those parts could be ordered and shipped before the vehicle even arrives at your shop. The depth of data may not be quite there yet, but it’s an interesting direction to start heading in.”

 

Langford also said he believes that few people will personally own an autonomous vehicle and that such vehicles primarily will be used as part of “mobility fleets,” such as Lyft or Uber or other monthly subscription services that provide transportation on demand. (He noted that Lyft currently is operating dozens of autonomous vehicles in Las Vegas, shuttling passengers between properties on the Strip.)

 

“By the time we have significant penetration of autonomous or highly automated vehicles, you won’t need one yourself,” Langford said. “It’s just not going to be cost-effective anymore.”

 

What will that mean for collision repairers?


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