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Monday, 26 November 2018 23:06

On the Lighter Side: When Enzo Ferrari Insulted Lamborghini, It Gave Birth to World’s 1st Supercar

Written by Ian Harvey, The Vintage News

Index

 

Lamborghini’s 1966 model, the Miura, is called the world’s first supercar, according to Maxim, and ensured that the line of sports cars bearing his name would become the well-known brand that it is today.

 

The car was revolutionary in some aspects, locating the engine behind the cockpit rather than where it had been traditionally located, in front of the windshield.

 

In the 1970s, Lamborghini triumphed again with the iconic Countach, a futuristic-looking car with the doors opening up rather than out as in most cars.

 

Eventually, Lamborghini sold his automobile business after experiencing some issues with his tractor business and retired to his vineyard.

 

The brand continued to make cars while changing hands several times and in the 1990s was purchased by Audi, a part of the Volkswagen group.

 

Automobili Lamborghini has since remained under the Audi brand and continued to be highly successful as well as gaining a reputation for better quality cars than ever before.

 

Lamborghini’s mascot is a raging bull, chosen by Ferruccio Lamborghini because his star sign is a Taurus.

 

Subsequently, many of the brand’s cars are named after specific bulls, breeds of bulls, or aspects of bullfighting, although there are exceptions. For example, the name Countach comes from an Italian expression that translates to ‘Wow!’ or ‘Holy cow!’ However, the Miura is named after a well-known breed of fighting bulls.

 

According to Business Insider, the Diablo, a car that debuted 1990, was named after a bull that participated in an epic drawn-out fight with a matador in 1869. Additionally, the Murciélago, a car from 2001, was named after a bull that was stabbed 24 times during a bullfight but still managed to survive.

 

Lamborghinis have quite a colorful origin story and show that when one experiences rejection, as Lamborghini did at the hands of Enzo Ferrari, it can sometimes motivate that person to create something even better than what has come before. Furthermore, it is inspirational that even from such humble beginnings as farm equipment, world-class supercars can emerge.

 

We thank The Vintage News for reprint permission. 


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