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20 Years ago in the Collision Repair Industry (October 1997)

 

In a meeting with the Automotive Service Association (ASA) earlier this year, Certified Automotive Parts Association (CAPA) Executive Director Jack Gillis outlined CAPA’s new standards and additional testing that will help ensure the quality of CAPA-certified crash parts. Gillis reviewed the plans with ASA in response to ASA’s dissatisfaction with CAPA’s performance.

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One of the many important steps in the claims handling process, according to Mike Cassata, owner of Hammer Insights, is proper photo and file documentation. 

Twenty-year-old Dylan Ahmdt took home gold at the 53rd annual National Leadership and Skills Conference (SkillsUSA) in Louisville, KY, which took place from June 19-23.

Estimating is often said to be one of the most important components of running a successful body shop.

In Anchorage, AK, body shop owner Ryan Cropper often tells customers that Able Body Shop is where strong values merge with quality work. Cropper currently operates two locations in The Last Frontier and said he has built his business on relationships and trust---one customer at a time. 

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When I began writing on this industry, there were no DRPs and all of the cars still had carburetors in them (remember those good old days?). Over the years, I have seen body shops step up in almost every way. 

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Thursday, 10 August 2017 17:18

Shop Owner David Ludwig Uses His Art to Give Back

Written by

Dave Ludwig, 58, owns Prestige Auto Body in Manchester, NH, a shop he started with just one helper back in 1986. 

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Has this ever happened to you? 

Tim Briggs, 44, and his wife, Ginger Briggs, are the owners of Collision Edge and the inventors of many products, including The Tape Thing, The Dent Viewer and The Estimating Kit. 

Monday, 17 July 2017 21:47

Techs of Tomorrow: Student Dreams of Working in Collision Repair After Graduation

Written by Victoria Antonelli

La Feria, TX, native Victoria Ramirez has always loved working with cars, which is why she made the decision to enroll at Texas State Technical College in 2016.


“My family and friends are very supportive of me attending technical school and pursuing collision repair,” she said. “TSTC was the obvious choice since it’s close to home.”


Ramirez already had an automotive certificate that she earned from TSTC in the summer of 2014, but she wanted to expand her education even further.


“I decided I didn't want to only learn the mechanical side,” Ramirez said. “I wanted to know how to return vehicles to pre-accident condition.”


Ramirez added that she especially wanted to learn about refinishing.


“I think refinishing is a work of art, and I’ve always loved art,” she explained.


Ramirez said that painting comes naturally to her.


“I’ve really enjoyed learning how to airbrush color, how to use candy colors, and how to pin stripe,” she said.


Ramirez has also competed in the national SkillsUSA competition in Louisville, KY, where her team finished in sixth place.


“The SkillsUSA competition was challenging, but we put on our best show,” she said.


Ramirez is also a member of the auto body club at her TSTC.


“I’d like to thank my instructors, Mr. J. Vasquez and Mr. Cantu, for supporting me and showing me their knowledge of the auto collision industry,” Ramirez added. “My three sons, Julien, Moses and Matthew, are also a huge inspiration to me. They make me want to be better for them.”


Despite her dedication to the craft and support from family and instructors, Ramirez said she still faces a specific adversity in the field---a common theme at technical colleges across the country.


“Being a woman in a male-dominated industry has been very challenging,” Ramirez said. “Others think that because I’m a woman, I won’t be able to get the job done or that I don’t know what I’m doing.”


The Texas native said the area she’s from is particularly challenging in this regard, which is why she hopes to leave after graduation in August 2017.


“I plan to move to a bigger city like Houston or Las Vegas to try my luck out there in the industry and work my way to the top of whichever shop I’m hired at,” Ramirez said. “I feel that here in the Rio Grande Valley, there are no jobs for a lady. People say girls are supposed to be behind a desk and not out there getting their hands dirty with paint or grease.”


For more information on TSTC, visit tstc.edu.

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