Twitter You Tube Facebook Autobodynews Linked In

Give some thoughtful people who are knowledgeable about the collision repair industry a chance to shine up a crystal ball and look into the future, and you're likely to hear some interesting things. 

During the 1980s and 1990s, association and seminar leaders frequently pointed to changes in vehicle technology that were putting a dent in the collision repair market. Daytime running lights, the third brake light and anti-lock braking systems (if drivers used them properly), they'd say, were among the key factors pulling accident frequency down. 

Rod Enlow joked that in mid-2005 as he became chairman of I-CAR's board of directors, it looked like it was going to be a fairly smooth and calm year for the training organization. The destructive forces of hurricanes Katrina and Rita turned out to be just one of the issues that ended up buffeting I-CAR during what Enlow now calls a challenging but successful year. 

One of the ways some shops are coping with what they are finding is decreasing profits in collision repair work is adding services beyond body work: mechanical work, detailing, and spray-on bed liners. 

Tuesday, 31 October 2006 17:00

SCRS state affiliate groups meet

In October, the Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) gathered representatives from more than a dozen of its affiliate associations across the country to exchange ideas and information on their groups' accomplishments and key issues. 

Hank Tarter jokes that if you're going to have a heart attack, the place to be is Keizer, Oregon, a community of 35,000 residents just north of Oregon's capitol city of Salem.

Probably everyone in the industry has heard some variation of the joke about wheels on toolboxes being the cause - or a result of - the high rate of turn-over among the industry's technicians.

Friday, 30 September 2005 17:00

Expanding your business - without DRPs

There's little doubt that much of the growth some collision repair businesses have experienced over the past decade has been fueled by insurer direct repair programs (DRPs). After all, the percentage of insurance-paid work handled through DRPs quadrupled - to more than 30 percent - between 1996 and 2002. Most major insurers are already well over that 30 percent mark - with some at 70 percent or more. 

Are you ready for the "personnel file" challenge? How well can you answer these questions: 

Monday, 31 October 2005 17:00

Part 2: what should be in a personnel file

An article in last month's issue outlined why maintaining personnel files is so critical - and explained some of the items that should not be kept in the files.