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The Best Body Shops' Tips

An important aspect of being a great leader is knowing when and how to create what Ken Perlman refers to as “psychological safety.”

During a recent Guild 21 podcast sponsored by VeriFacts, Bryan Robaina asked attendees if it’s best to replace parts with new ones during a repair to maintain the vehicle’s OEM / Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) status. 

 During a recent webinar, Nick Schoolcraft explored the three most common causes behind unfavorable customer interactions at collision repair facilities. He also shared tactics and tools to help attendees overcome these obstacles to enhance their businesses. 

 

With nearly 23 million vehicles involved in accidents annually---a statistic that is trending upward, according to Vincent Romans, The Romans Group---body shops across the country are being faced with deciding if they should repair or replace non-structural components during the repair process. 

 

Collision repair facilities can typically increase profits by raising prices and/or working to become more efficient, according to Mark Olson, CEO of VECO Experts (Vehicle Collision Experts, LLC). 

Now more than ever, it is crucial to follow OEM procedures and focus on the operations of every vehicle during the repair process so there are no surprises, according to Jake Rodenroth, director of industry relations for asTech.

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Whether a body shop is looking to increase productivity, enhance team performance or foster better leaders, Adrianna Marino said emotional intelligence can help achieve such business goals and be a key factor in running a successful company.

Just over 60 years ago, Jack Taylor founded Enterprise Rent-A-Car in St. Louis, Missouri.

According to surveys conducted by Phoenix Solutions Group (PSG), close to 80 percent of body shop customers choose a collision repair facility that they feel has their best interests at heart.

Keith Manich of the Automotive Training Institute (ATI) said collision repairers tell him on a regular basis that they often hear the word “no” when asking to be paid for required procedures associated with the repair plan, and that they “feel intimidated.”

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