Monday, 27 February 2012 18:42

Proposed Amendment to Florida 80-percent threshold for totals

An amendment may be offered to Florida House Bill 1101 that would eliminate the current 80 percent threshold for a total-loss vehicle to receive a certificate of destruction, thus allowing potentially unsafe vehicles to be branded as “repairable” and put back on the roads. The amendment would allow insurers to determine whether the vehicle receives a certificate of destruction.

The Automotive Service Association is opposed to this amendment because it could:

  • Allow unsafe vehicles to operate on Florida’s highways. The amendment would require dangerous vehicles to be branded “repairable” when such vehicles should not be put back on the roads as they cannot be adequately repaired to operate safely.
  • Allow insurance companies to determine whether or not a vehicle should obtain a certificate of destruction. Without the current 80 percent threshold that requires a total-loss vehicle to obtain a certificate of destruction, vehicles that should not be repaired can be returned to the roads.
  • Create dangers for consumers who would be unable to identify the level of damage that a vehicle has sustained since the vehicle branding will not reflect the actual designation of the vehicle as “unrebuildable.” This language would put drivers at risk by removing the only guarantee for consumers to ensure that their vehicles are safe to operate on Florida’s roads.
  • Permit unsafe vehicles that are supposed to be dismantled and crushed by automotive recyclers to be sold as “repairable,” creating a situation where the source of undamaged recycled parts will be seriously diminished and local jobs most definitely compromised.
  • Increase the risk for criminal activity as vehicles that are badly damaged would be allowed to obtain a clean title and sold to unsuspecting purchasers.

To view the full text of the bill, as well as ASA’s letter to the legislature opposing the amendment, visit ASA’s legislative website at www.TakingTheHill.com.

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