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Tuesday, 17 March 2009 13:32

Evans---Pneumatic Sanding Tips from Rich Evans

Written by Rich Evans
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Rich Evans uses only Chicago Pneumatic orbital sanders, which he believes are the best orbital sanders on the market, to create award winning designs at Huntington Beach Bodyworks.

 CP7215 – I use the CP7215 for cutting and shaping. When you lay your bondo and want to shape it, the CP7215 covers more area and
cuts more aggressively than other sanders. Once I spread the bondo and cut it, I’ll shape it with the CP7215, because it cuts faster and allows me to get the shape and true form without taking it too far. I typically only use a 36 or 40 grit sand paper with this sander.

CP7255 – I use the CP7255 for shaping radiant areas. It’s slower than the CP7215 and provides a less aggressive cut. I will typically go down to an 80 grit sand paper with the CP7255, but you could even use a 150 grit. I prefer the 80 grit sand paper for fine tuning. If it’s a little dent or ding you can use the CP7255 to buff the ding – for small dings you can keep the shape without cutting too much – and then you can feather the edge.

CP7225 – I use the CP7225 for final feather-edging, light body work and prepping vehicles for paint. When you’re prepping a vehicle for the paint booth, completely sand the whole vehicle with 150, 320 or 400 grit sand paper in order to remove the scratches caused by
the 80 or 150 grit. I also use the CP7225 for blocking the primer areas.

I’ve used a lot of sanders and the reason I prefer the CP random orbit palm sanders is that the handle is the perfect size and you can accurately control the throttle with your hand. In addition, the sanders are light, quiet and have no vibration whatsoever.

Having all three sanders is definitely a must. The color-coded orbits are great when you’re reaching down to grab them during a job. Without the coded orbits, it’s difficult to tell them apart without checking your sand paper grit. When using other sanders, you don’t know which sander you have in your hand – this can be very frustrating if you start sanding with the wrong grit paper when you’re switching back and forth between sanders.You want to always make sure that you are using the right tool for the process.

Because of my experience level, I don’t use a straight line sander very often. But, I do use the CP7268 on special applications or to true a really large panel. For the typical user it’s a good tool for shaping longer and straighter panels.

When using a straight line sander, technicians should remember to never hold it straight. You should always cross cut with a straight line sander. For example, on a radius area you want to cut it one way and then flip the sander and cut it the other way in an X pattern so you keep the metal consistent and flat.

Also when sanding, never put pressure on these sanders – just let them do the work. If you push too hard you can cut too much and create low spots in your bondo work. You’ll get faster and better results if you let the sander do its job. And it’s less of a workout for you. Remember, don’t muscle it. Just be the guide.

SIDEBAR: There’s no real way to store your DAs other than throwing them
on some shelf somewhere. Or, if you are like me, you store
them in the largest drawer of your tool box. The problem with
this is that over time the pads of our DAs get damaged and
warped. If your pad is warped, you no longer have a true
surface to sand with and you won’t get a true rotation, which
will wear the tool out faster. This could cause low or high spots
in your body work. Another problem is that your tool box or
work area gets cluttered up very fast.

To solve this problem, I designed a holster style rack for
storing my Chicago Pneumatic sanders. The rack is magnetic
and fits right inside a tool box, or it’ll hang on the car you’re
working on. With my DA hangers, you can finally have a nice
organized toolbox or work area, and your DAs stay in great
condition. Vim Tools is now manufacturing these hangers –
check them out:

Read 2485 times Last modified on Tuesday, 13 December 2016 23:58