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Wednesday, 15 June 2016 22:30

Preparations Underway for Fall Automechanika Chicago Commitment to Training Events

Automechanika Chicago and its organizers Messe Frankfurt and UBM Americas | Automotive Group (formerly Advanstar Communications, Inc.) had more than 100 automotive professionals attend their inaugural single-day training program at Washtenaw Community College in Ann Arbor, MI. Preparations are underway for two fall events in cooperation with technical colleges in select markets to help support automotive repair professionals in the service repair and collision repair markets.

According to Automechanika, the series of free training programs began in May as part of a new "Commitment To Training" initiative supported by the generosity of industry sponsors. Top instructors from both the mechanical and collision repair industries presented their classes to full rooms. Automotive professionals from as far away as New York, New Hampshire, Illinois, Ohio, Virginia and Ontario, Canada attended the event. Attendees received certificates toward continuing education credits, including AMi and NATEF certifications.

The facility hosted the inaugural event as part of the initiative aimed at training today's automotive professionals while providing them with a network to learn from peers.

"I'm very excited by the response to our first one-day training event," said Pete Meier, director of training for UBM's Automotive Group, which includes Motor Age and ABRN magazines. "The professionals who attended the event really understand the need to continue learning about the changing technology and procedures needed to repair vehicles today. I think they all took away lessons they can use immediately in their shops around the country."

Mike Rowe, a technician at H&I Expert Auto Care in Rochester Hills, MI, learned about the event through Motor Age Training and while studying to become ASE certified. "I want to be better at what I'm doing and have answers for questions from customers," he said, adding he was excited to learn from Meier and his electrical and scope class. "I've seen him on YouTube, and seeing him in real life was a lot of fun and very informative."

Trainers for the sessions included Mike Anderson of Collision Advice; G. Jerry Truglia of ATTS and TST; Larry Montanez of P&L Consultants; Brad Mewes of Supplement, and Meier.

In additional to his two educational sessions, Anderson presented an industry keynote during breakfast and representatives from the Advanced Transportation Center at Washtenaw Community College introduced attendees to the program that focuses on connected vehicles and the associated infrastructure. Attendees toured the facility following a catered lunch.

The event at Washtenaw Community College was the first of three no-cost live events scheduled for 2016. Events are scheduled for Oct. 15 at Fox Valley Technical College in Appleton, WI and Nov. 19 at Joliet Junior College in Joliet, IL. Details of the events will be available once registration begins later this summer.

The Commitment to Training program is made possible by support from manufacturer sponsors Carquest Technical Institute, Delphi, Garmat USA, Abaris Training, Mitchell 1, PPG, Polyvance, Pico Technology, Schaeffler Automotive Aftermarket, Mitchell International, Motor Age Training, Axalta and GFS.

"We're very fortunate to have the involvement of leading companies in the service repair and collision repair market as we continue our ongoing efforts to properly train shop owners, managers, technicians and educators," said Jim Savas, vice president of UBM Americas, Automotive Group. "This program, in partnership with vocational colleges in Michigan, Illinois and Wisconsin will feature instructors known for providing outstanding content that can help shops keep pace with changing vehicle technology."

The initiative culminates at Automechanika Chicago 2017, scheduled for July 26-29 in Chicago. For more information, visit http://automechanika.searchautoparts.com/commitment-to-training.

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